Flower Moon

Delta Lake State Park

As they say, ‘Even a blind squirrel finds an acorn once in a while’, which would describe Thursday morning appropriately. All week I have been going out before work to find a sunrise. Yesterday, as I stepped outside to place the latest recyclables in the bin for collection, I couldn’t help but notice the full moon. My initial plan to head toward Utica for a sunrise was immediately changed to ‘can I capture the moonset?’

Checking the Photographer’s Ephemeris I see that the sun will rise at 5:48am and the moon will set at 6:08am. The best location for the show would be Delta Lake State Park. There were a few clouds in the sky and the moon was beginning to be obscured but working with my new attitude of ‘you have to be in the environment to capture the landscape’, I headed off for the park.

It was a cool, calm morning and being at the water’s edge waiting on the moon was totally worth it. Not another person in sight. I could hear ducks and geese out on the lake and the clouds were moving in the right direction. What a way to start the morning!

The first two images were my view of the lake as I arrived at the park. I knew the moon was out there behind the clouds… be patient, don’t call it a day yet!

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Flower Moon I

Flower Moon I
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 6s, 12mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Flower Moon II

Flower Moon II
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 3.2s, 15mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

I initially setup the camera at the edge of the beach. After standing there for five to ten minutes I realized I wanted to isolate the trees on the point in my composition. I walked around to the right of the beach and found a nice big rock under a tree on the water’s edge. This allowed for a ‘cleaner’ view and would allow the moon to stand out more in the image (when it finally quit hiding in the clouds).

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Flower Moon III

Flower Moon III
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/6s, 36mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Flower Moon IV

Flower Moon IV
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/10s, 40mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

It was after the last capture I realized to truly emphasize the moon I needed a longer lens. Switching to the 40-150mm telephoto lens I was able to bring the moon larger into the image. By the last two images the sun was above the horizon and throwing lots of color into the western sky. It was a great way to end my adventure and I was totally charged for the day ahead of me.

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Flower Moon V

Flower Moon V
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 40-150mm f/4-5.6 R, 1/13s, 85mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Flower Moon VI

Flower Moon VI
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 40-150mm f/4-5.6 R, 1/30s, 150mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

It wasn’t until later in the day that I learned this was the last ‘super moon’ of 2020. I also learned it is called the ‘Flower Moon’. Digging into the name a little more I found you can also call the full moon in May the ‘Corn Planting Moon’, the ‘Hare Moon’, and the ‘Milk Moon’. On the Full Moon Phases website I also picked up this bit of information…

Full Moon names have been used by many cultures to describe the full moon throughout the year. Specifically, Native American tribes used moon phases and cycles to keep track of the seasons by giving a distinctive name to each recurring full moon, including the Wolf Moon. The unique full moon names were used to identify the entire month during which each occurred.

Although many Native American tribes gave distinct names to the full moon, the most well known full moon names come from the Algonquin tribes who lived in the area of New England and westward to Lake Superior. The Algonquin tribes had perhaps the greatest effect on the early European settlers in America, and the settlers adopted the Native American habit of naming the full moons.

…as the sun goes down

Delta Lake State Park

You have to be in the environment to capture the landscape. This thought ran through my head last evening as I waited for the sun to reach that perfect distance from the horizon. I have been making more of an effort to haul my lazy butt out of the house and it is paying off in image possibilities.

When I started my photography journey I was out exploring every free minute. I was learning, experimenting, trying new things. Now that I know everything… LOL, I have become complacent. Normal thoughts that have run through my mind…

  1. doesn’t look like it will be a good sunrise/sunset
  2. I’ve captured that view before
  3. I’ve done a lot of… lately
  4. it’s a long drive to get there, what if…
  5. maybe later

This week I have been changing the status quo. I have ventured out into the pre-dawn morning, energizing myself for the workday. I have been driving to familiar locations for the sunset, on the off chance it will be worth seeing. You have to be in the environment to capture the landscape.

There was a better than normal chance the clouds would roll in and obscure the sunset last night. I still went to Delta Lake. It was so worth it! I spent the hour before the sun reached the horizon capturing long exposure images. I had my ten-stop ND filter on and was happy capturing 15-20 second exposures around the lake (more on those in a later post).

The park was practically empty and there was barely any breeze. As the sun approached its ideal location I staked out my spot, setup the tripod and waited for the show. This image is one I would have missed if I was still listening to that little lazy voice in my head…

 

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; ...as the sun goes down

…as the sun goes down
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/15s, 12mm, f/11, ISO 100

Moving In

Bellamy Harbor Park

I did something a little out of the ordinary for me yesterday. Well, at least something different in this work from home environment we are currently living in. Generally I am online for work by 6am, but yesterday morning I was itching for a sunrise image. The urge was especially strong once I noticed the approaching clouds.

I finished the first cup of coffee while posting my latest image, filled the travel mug with the remainder, grabbed the camera bag and headed down to Bellamy Harbor Park. The clouds were moving in fast. I setup the tripod on the edge of the wall supporting the barge canal flow control gates. It is my go to spot at the harbor as it allows the widest view of the park and it appears as though the camera is in the middle of the canal.

I still made it back home in time to be online at my normal hour but I was energized for the day. I think getting out into the morning air, even if it is to drive to work, gets everything going for me. It is what has been lacking while I am sequestered in my apartment riding out this pandemic storm.

Time to get dressed and do it again today…

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Moving In

Moving In
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mmm f/2.8, 4s, 16mm, f/16, ISO 64

 

The Other Falls

Chittenango Falls State Park

I had another waterfall adventure on Sunday morning. This time I took a leisurely day out to Chittenango Falls State Park. I mistakenly thought if I arrived fairly early on a Sunday morning I would not encounter too many people. Others had the same thought, or maybe, everyone needed some sunshine. It wasn’t so crowded that I was unable to get my images, but there were more people than I anticipated.

Chittenango Creek was flowing fairly heavy and the amount of water going over the falls was incredible. I’ll have a few images of the main falls later in the week. For today, my focus is on another. The extra water activated the other waterfall within the park. It is in an alcove below the main falls off the trail on the way to the bottom of the gorge.

It is early enough in the season that the trees have barely any leaves. Typically, the sun has a difficult time penetrating the cover to reach into the alcove. I was fortunate to have enough light I did not need to bracket this view nor create an HDR image. This image was worth the drive…

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; The Other Falls

The Other Falls
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f2.8, 0.8s, 22mm, f/11, ISO 200

 

Pixley Spring

Pixley Falls State Park

Saturday morning started off a little disappointing as a heavy fog hung over the city. I had been looking forward to venturing out into the pre-dawn morning in search of the sunrise. I dragged my butt out to the laundromat early enough and left myself plenty of time for an morning adventure… and then the fog.

Luckily, it didn’t last long. As I was sitting at the computer working on images the sun started to break through the fog. I didn’t wait for the complete transition to a sunny day, I grabbed the camera and headed North to Pixley Falls.

The twenty minute drive had me questioning my decision as the fog and cloud cover increased the further I drove. And then, boom, the sky opened up and I had nothing but blue above me. The change was dramatic but welcomed. My adventure was on…

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Pixley Reflected

Pixley Reflected
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/3s, 19mm, f/11, ISO 100

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Pixley Spring

Pixley Spring
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/5s, 26mm, f/11, ISO 100

Dam Dreams

Delta Lake Dam

Last Saturday was a beautiful day and I was not about to sit on my butt all day. Around mid-morning I took off with the camera in search of pictures. My adventure started with flowers but eventually I found myself heading toward Delta Lake. My initial thought was to walk the trails in the state park but upon seeing the water flowing over the dam I stopped to explore the opposite side of Delta Lake.

It has been a while since I last photographed the dam. It was an often used destination when I started on my photographic journey and I’m not exactly positive why I have not been back. Although I would prefer capturing images with more green in the trees, I could not pass up the water flowing over the dam. I made a full circle tour of the area grabbing images from every view. Even with a wonderful blue sky I felt this series looked better in monochrome…

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Dam Dreams 1

Dam Dreams 1
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/200s, 19mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Dam Dreams 2

Dam Dreams 2
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/250s, 14mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Dam Dreasm 3

Dam Dreams 3
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/320s, 12mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Dam Dreams 4

Dam Dreams 4
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/100s, 14mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Dam Dreams 5

Dam Dreams 5
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/250s, 25mm, f/11, ISO 200

  

MLCreations Photography: Blog Post Related &emdash; Dam Dreams 6

Dam Dreams 6
Olympus E-M1 Mark II, M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 1/320s, 14mm, f/11, ISO 200